How to do a Twesentation

Written by Silja on 6 July 2011 in #hcsmeu - No comments
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I just went through my slideshare presentations, as part of my summer clean up, and was awed to find this presentation feature over 1600 views!



Andrew and I gave it back in Sept last year to honor #hcsmeu 1st birthday at digipharm in London.It was a “golden” opportunity for Andrew and I to promote #hcsmeu to pharma marketers. Quite contrary to our usual “on-the-fly” social media attitude, we had put our hearts into this presentation. We had prepared and even rehearsed who was going to say what, when!

Yet, I had indulged in a great time with my #hcsmeu buddies at a tweetup in a very noisy London bar the evening before. When it came my turn to present the next day, I had lost my voice completely! No way I was going let Andrew and #hcsmeu down though. I just had to find a way to present without my voice!

I had been playing around in my head with ways in which I could mimic social media in my presentations and workshops to engage participants and make them “feel” its power for a while. I decided, I was going to try one of these ways out.

Since #hcsmeu is all about twitter, I was simply going to tweet my part of the presentation. With only 30min to go before I was due to present, I transformed everything I wanted to say into 140 character tweetable bullets (incl. the #hcsmeu and #digipharm hastags, of course). I made Dominic Tyer (who had the misfortune to sit next to me) my partner in crime. He copied, pasted and tweeted each bullet into the conference tweet stream, while I projected it next to the presentation on stage during my presentation.

I did not expect people to enjoy my experimentation. I actually feared some would get up and just leave. Yet the opposite happened. In what is usually the most difficult time slot, the end of the day, people stepped up and explained to each other what twitter, a hashtag or #hcsmeu was. They got energized and engaged.

People following the conference remotely also greatly appreciated the format and coined the term “twesentation”, because it allowed them to follow what was going on in the room via twitter.

The moral of my little the story? I can think of two:

1. Social media is about people engaging with one another. Any time you teach social media (or anything else for that matter), your priority has to be to create engagement amongst everyone in the room. Make people realize that the awesome learning and support they feel right there in the room by talking to each other is something readily available to them 24/7 around the globe, and you have made the case for social media!

2. I should remain quiet more often. People enjoy it! #notlikelytohappen

 

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